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5 Questions to Help You Find Your Perfect Accessible Home

Eclectic-ware
Published by Patrick Young in Website Stuff / Miscellaneous · 30 January 2021
Tags: disability
On the hunt for a new home? If you live with a disability, the road to that new home may look a little different. That’s because you may need certain features to accommodate your needs and settle into your new home safely. If you want to take the hassle out of finding and buying an accessible home, be sure to ask yourself a few questions.

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How much can I afford?

Before you start searching for that perfect new place, you need to think carefully about how much you can reasonably afford to pay for your new home. If you’re not sure, there are plenty of online tools to help you figure out an ideal price range. Once you have a number in mind, you can start looking at current home prices in your prospective locations using a reliable real estate website like Redfin. For example, you can see that homes in Wimauma have sold for an average of around $258K over the last 30 days.

What are my home loan options?

After you’ve determined your budget for your new home, it’s time to think about how you will cover your purchase. For most people, that means researching home mortgages and determining the best option for your financial needs and current financial status. If you became disabled due to a service-related injury or have served time in the military, you could be eligible for one of several programs for veterans. Then you may not have to take on the added expenses of a down payment or mortgage insurance and can secure a lower interest rate.

What home features do I need?

Once you’ve figured out the financial side of buying a new home, you can start thinking about what that home will look like. You should first think about what sort of features you will need to make performing everyday tasks safe and comfortable. This list can vary depending on what disabilities you are living with, your needs, and your overall lifestyle. For instance, if you use a wheelchair, you may need to look for a single-story home that has wider doorways and step-less entryways to accommodate your needs. You may also need accessible cabinets and extra lighting.  

Will I need help with my move?

While all of this is in the works, you should also start thinking about the steps you will need to take to plan a safe and low-stress move. One of the first steps to consider is whether you will need to hire professional movers. With a disability, you may want to think about hiring movers, rather than taking on the added stress and strain of a DIY move. Use consumer reviews to find a moving service online that you can trust to provide the assistance you need.

Will I need to make modifications?

Another thing you will want to think about before your move is whether your new home will need to be remodeled or modified to fit your needs. If the bathroom in your new home is not disability-friendly, for example, you may need to have it remodeled to include features like adjustable countertops or lower sinks. The reason why you should think about these modifications ahead of time is that it will be much easier to have them completed when your home is empty. Plus, it can take time to find the right professionals to help with your remodeling and repair projects.

Finding a new home, planning a move, and making modifications can all be stressful processes on their own. So when you are trying to tackle all these tasks at once, it helps to have a few helpful tips and resources to make finding and settling into your perfect accessible home less of a hassle.

Patrick Young


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